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The Association of Arbours Psychotherapists
Welcomes

“Artificial Intelligence and Human Intelligence: The Future of Psychotherapy”

AAP / CPJA Ethics Conference

Invitation to Participate

“Part of our wish list for our lives and our future should be disentangling wisdom from intelligence. In our era of Big Data and algorithms, they’re easy to conflate.” ― Arianna Huffington, Founder of Huffington Post

My Image
Andrew Buchanan | Unsplash

|Humans now have better general intelligence than machines do, but for how much longer?
Given enough time, machine intelligence will go beyond the abilities of our brains.
Then what?

We do not know what future artificial intelligence will be like.
We do not know whether it will have experiences or whether it will know what it is like to be intelligent. We know that humans have subjective experiences. Without experiences, we would be unlikely to find meaning in life.
Will a machine need to have subjective experience?

Psychotherapists want to know whether their role in talking to their clients or patients could be simulated. A mechanical gadget could be programmed to comment on what was being said to it.

Would it matter whether it grasped the meaning of what it was listening to or saying?

There are important ethical questions for psychotherapists. Would psychotherapists’ notes on patients be safe from hacking or exploitation? Patient data in various forms can be accumulated and shared with a machine. But a machine would have to be programmed to be discreet.

It is doubtful that it could be programmed to care.

We hope AI would have a morality that aligns with our own. Would we be able to talk over moral topics with machines and consult them with ethical dilemmas?
They would not know what it is like to be a human. They would not have had parents, or childhoods, or illnesses, or sexual experiences, or fears of death.

We might insist our AI entities go on Continuing Professional Development courses each year to accumulate points. Could AI arrange a conference to talk over its findings with us? Could it write an essay about itself, such as this one, posing these issues to us?

Whatever the future of AI, humans will wish to enrich their own experiences. Therefore we have one speaker who will talk about the use of psychedelics in psychotherapy.

London has been called the "AI capital of the world"? If AI did have a conference, would London be the location?

Dr Morton Schatzman, a founder of Arbours, introduces and chairs our September 2019 conference
Mr Adam Saltiel, AAP Co-Chair, CPJA Ethics Committee member, is the conference organiser



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This site provides the schedule, background and biographical information
for the AAP/CPJA Conference with links to puchase tickets below.

Day Event

Date: Saturday, September 21st 2019

  • Time: 9.00am – 5.50pm
  • Registration and Orientation from: 8.15am
  • Welcome: 8.45am
  • Wind Down with Cheese and Wine: 5.00pm
  • Conference End: 5.50pm

    CPD 6hrs
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Student

Students and Trainees Limited Availability

Now discounted to £35.00

Student or Trainee Ticket

£35.00
We are pleased to have a number of tickets available for trainees/students at a cost of £45

General

General Public
Now at a discounted price

General Admission Ticket
Available to 14th September 2019

£60.00

Registration is from 8:15 AM, Welcome at 8:45 AM

Distinguished Speakers and Chair

Professor Jeremy Holmes MD
Department of Clinical Psychology in the School of Psychology, University of Exeter
The brain has a mind of its own: active inference (AI), and the new science of psychotherapy

Dr Kate Devlin
Social and Cultural Artificial Intelligence, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College, London
Technological change: forecasting our future relationships with machines

Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
Turing Fellow, Professor of Mathematics for Healthcare, University of Exeter
Individual motor signatures and socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia

Dr Oliver Bashford
Consultant liaison psychiatrist, East Surrey Hospital, Surrey and Borders Partnership, NHS Foundation Trust
Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy: past, present and future

Dr Mark Freestone
Turing Fellow, Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London
Thinking causally about personality, offending and violence prevention

Dr Maria Liakata
Turing Fellow, University of Warwick
Opportunities and challenges in employing automated analysis of language and heterogeneous user generated content to support monitoring of mental health

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Markus Spiske | Unsplash Made with Canon 5d Mark III and loved analog lens, Leica APO Macro Elmarit-R 2.8 / 100mm (Year: 1993)

Dr Morton Schatzman: Chair
The Arbours was established in the early 1970s by Dr Joseph Berke, Dr Morton Schatzman and others.
Notes and links

• AAP : Association of Arbours Psychotherapists
• UKCP : UK Council for Psychotherapy
• CPJA : Council for Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis

Arbours Association | AAP
The Arbours Association is a registered UK charity, and was set up in 1970 to provide help and places to live for people in emotional distress. It has trained many psychotherapists, whose professional body is the Association of Arbours Psychotherapists.

Arbours is a founding member organisation of the UKCP (CPJA section).

The AAP is the professional body of Arbours
https://www.arboursassociation.org
This conference:-
https://aapweb.website

UKCP | About UKCP
The UKCP is the leading organisation for the education, training and accreditation of psychotherapists and psychotherapeutic counsellors in the UK.
PSYCHOTHERAPY.ORG.UK
Council for Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis
Find a psychotherapist with extensive training.
CPJA.ORG.UK

Full Agenda Start
Arrival from 8:15am 8:15
Welcome 8:45
Professor Jeremy Holmes MD, Department of Clinical Psychology in the School of Psychology, University of Exeter 9:00
The Brain has a Mind of its Own: AI, neurobiology and the science of psychotherapy
Dr Kate Devlin, Social and Cultural Artificial Intelligence, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College, London 9:35
Technological change: forecasting our future relationships with machines
Q & A 10:10
Break 10:30
Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova, Turing Fellow, Professor of Mathematics for Healthcare, University of Exeter 10:45
Individual motor signatures and socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia
Break 11:20
Plenary + Q & A With morning speakers. Plenary discussions chaired by Dr Morton Schatzman 11:35
Lunch and facilitated discussion groups (see below)* 12:05
45 minutes for each group
Dr Oliver Bashford, Consultant liaison psychiatrist, East Surrey Hospital, Surrey and Borders Partnership, NHS Foundation Trust 13:35
Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy: past, present and future
Q & A 14:10
Dr Mark Freestone, Turing Fellow, Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London 14:30
Thinking causally about personality, offending, and violence prevention
Break 15:05
Dr Maria Liakata, Turing Fellow, University of Warwick 15:20
Opportunities and challenges in employing automated analysis of language and heterogeneous user generated content to support monitoring of mental health
Plenary + Q & A With afternoon speakers 15:55
Break 16:15
Final Plenary - Discussion with day’s speakers 16:30
Cheese and Wine 17:00
Finish at 5:50pm 17:50
CPD 6hrs

*During the day there will be panel discussions with Q&A.
Around lunchtime, there will be small facilitated 45-minute groups where participants can explore issues raised.

Speakers

Professor Jeremy Holmes
Professor Jeremy Holmes was for 35 years Consultant Psychiatrist/Medical Psychotherapist at University College London (UCL) and then in North Devon, UK, and Chair of the Psychotherapy Faculty of the Royal College of Psychiatrists 1998-2002. He is visiting Professor at the University of Exeter, and lectures nationally and internationally.
He was recipient of the Bowlby-Ainsworth Founders Award 2009. Music-making, gardening, Green politics and grand-parenting are gradually eclipsing his lifetime devotion to psychoanalytic psychotherapy and attachment.

Dr Kate Devlin
Dr Kate Devlin has become a driving force in the field of intimacy and technology, running the UK's first sex tech hackathon in 2016. In short, she has become the face of sex robots – quite literally in the case of one mis-captioned tabloid photograph. She has written articles on the subject for New Scientist, Prospect and the Sunday Times among others. She has featured on BBC Radio, presented on TV, at TEDx and other tech and philosophy events, festivals and comedy nights. She was probably the first person to say 'sex robots' in the House of Lords – in an official capacity, at least.

Home page: Dr Kate Devlin

Professor Jeremy Holmes
The Brain has a Mind of its Own: AI, neurobiology and the science of psychotherapy

Synopsis

The past decade has seen the advent of an exciting new metapsychology, Karl Friston's Free Energy principle. I shall outline these new ideas, showing how they validate the work of psychoanalytic psychotherapists, especially their emphasis on free association, dream analysis, and an analytic stance that both simulates and helps clarify ambiguity. I shall suggest that key mutative features of psychotherapy are its capacity to provide a secure base, to help clients move from passivity to activity and to tolerate ’surprise’, which then help generate novel and more complex generative models of the self and its relationships.

Bio & Bibliography

In addition to producing 200+ peer-reviewed papers and chapters in the field of psychoanalysis and attachment theory, he wrote a best seller: John Bowlby and Attachment Theory, (2nd edition 2013). He was Chair of the Psychotherapy Faculty of the Royal College of Psychiatrists 1998-2002. Now partially retired, he has a part-time private practice set up and teaches on the Masters/Doctoral psychoanalytic psychotherapy training and research programme at Exeter University, where he is a visiting Professor.
He also lectures nationally and internationally. His many books, translated into seven languages, include:
The Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy (2005, co-editors Glen Gabbard and Judy Beck),
Exploring In Security: Towards an Attachment-informed Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (Routledge 2010) which won the 2010 Canadian Psychological Association Goethe Award.
2013 saw the 6-volume compendium of the 100 most important papers in Attachment (Benchmarks in Psychology: Attachment Theory, SAGE, co-edited with A. Slade).
Literature and the Therapeutic Imagination and Attachments: Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis were published by Routledge in 2014.
He was the recipient of the 2009 New York Attachment Consortium Bowlby-Ainsworth Founders Award.

Dr Kate Devlin
Technological change: forecasting our future relationships with machines

Synopsis

Dr Devlin will discuss the implication technological adoption has for us as individuals and as a society.

Bio & Bibliography

Dr Devlin conducts her research from the Social and Cultural Artificial Intelligence, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College, London in the fields of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), examining how society interacts with and reacts to technological change and what we can learn from that in forecasting new and emerging tech, particularly in terms of our relationships with machines. She is an expert in the field of intimacy and technology.
Author of the highly acclaimed book “Turned On: Science, Sex and Robots” Bloomsbury, 2018

Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova has been engaged in collaborative projects in the area of movement science, experimental psychology and healthcare technologies. She has a long-standing interest in applied dynamical systems theory, numerical continuation, scientific computing and data-driven modelling.

As a Turing Fellow, Professor Tsaneva-Atanasova hopes to leverage on her experience in collaborative projects and consolidate her research activities in data analytics and its applications to healthcare. Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.).
An example would be her pilot work on developing virtual reality-based diagnostics tools for mental health disorders, which has been tested in France. In order to successfully bring this to the UK she needs to engage with relevant software engineers and industrial partners across the UK and expand further her expertise in advanced statistical and machine learning techniques.

Website: Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova

Dr Oliver Bashford
Dr Bashford completed his undergraduate medical degree at the University of Edinburgh in 2008. He undertook medical foundation training in West London before moving into psychiatry. He completed core and higher training in psychiatry with the South London and Maudsley training programme.

Dr Bashford became a member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in 2012. In 2014 he was awarded a Diploma in Geriatric Medicine from the Royal College of Physicians. He joined Surrey and Borders Foundation Trust as a Consultant Psychiatrist in August 2016 where he works in liaison psychiatry at East Surrey Hospital and in the East Surrey Community Mental Health Recovery Service for older adults.

He has an interest in the overlap between physical and psychological health and in the management of psychological and behavioural problems associated with neurodegenerative conditions.

Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
Individual motor signatures and socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia

Synopsis


Human movement has been studied for decades, and dynamic laws of motion that are common to all humans have been derived. Yet, every individual moves differently from everyone else (faster/slower, harder/smoother, etc.). We propose an index of such variability, namely an individual motor signature (IMS) able to capture the subtle differences in the way each of us moves. We show that the IMS of a person is time-invariant and that it significantly differs from those of other individuals (1). Furthermore, in an effort to establish reliable indicators of schizophrenia we have developed a method that could detect deficits in movement and social interactions, both characteristics of the disorder. We asked people to perform movements alone, and to mirror the movements of a computer avatar or a humanoid robot. Using mathematical modelling and statistical learning techniques we were able to distinguish people with schizophrenia from healthy participants with accuracy and specificity slightly better than clinical interviews and comparable to tests based on much more expensive neuroimaging methods (2). This methodology could help with diagnosis of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric conditions such as psychosis and potentially to also monitor patients' responses to therapeutic treatment.

Bio & Bibliography

Turing Fellow, Professor of Mathematics for Healthcare, University of Exeter
Professor Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova is a Turing Fellow, her pilot work has been on developing virtual reality-based diagnostics tools for mental health disorders, which have been tested in France.
As part of her research Professor Tsaneva-Atanasova focuses on novel applications of mathematics to enable the development of quantitative methods for healthcare and healthcare technologies.
Professor Tsaneva-Atanasova earned her undergraduate and MSc degrees in mathematics at the University of Plovdiv, Bulgaria In September 2001. She started a PhD in applied mathematics at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. After completing her PhD in October 2004 she spent 18 months as a post-doctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Biological Modelling, National Institutes of Health, USA and another 15 months as a post-doctoral fellow at the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Biology at Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, France.
Professor Tsaneva-Atanasova joined the Department of Engineering Mathematics at the University of Bristol in October 2007 as a lecturer and was promoted to a Reader in Applied Mathematics in 2012.
She moved to the College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter in July 2013 where she is currently a Professor of Mathematics for Healthcare.
More recently as a Turing Fellow she has also engaged in collaborative projects in the area of movement science, experimental psychology and healthcare technologies.

(1) Słowiński P, Zhai C, Alderisio F, Salesse R, Gueugnon M, Marin L, Bardy BG, di Bernardo M, Tsaneva-Atanasova K. (2016) Dynamic similarity promotes interpersonal coordination in joint action, Journal of The Royal Society Interface, volume 13, no. 116, DOI:10.1098/rsif.2015.1093.

(2) Słowiński, P., Alderisio, F., Zhai, C., Shen, Y., Tino, P., Bortolon, C., Capdevielle D., Cohen L., Khoramshahi M., Billard A., Salesse R., Gueugnon M., Marin L., Bardy B., di Bernardo M., Raffard S., Tsaneva-Atanasova, K (2017) Unravelling socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia, npj Schizophrenia, volume 3, no. 1, DOI:10.1038/s41537-016-0009-x

Dr Oliver Bashford
Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy: past, present and future

Individual motor signatures and socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia

Synopsis

To Follow

Bio & Bibliography

Consultant liaison psychiatrist, East Surrey Hospital, Surrey and Borders Partnership, NHS Foundation Trust
Dr Bashford completed his undergraduate medical degree at the University of Edinburgh in 2008. He undertook medical foundation training in West London before moving into psychiatry. He completed core and higher training in psychiatry with the South London and Maudsley training programme.
In 2015 Dr Bashford worked on a pilot study using psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression as an honorary research associate at Imperial College London. In the same year he co-founded the Maudsley Psychedelic Society to raise awareness of and promote discussion about the therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs.

Dr Maria Liakata
Dr Liakata is researching NLP for social science. She holds an IBM Faculty Award for studying “Emotion sensing using heterogeneous mobile phone data” and is a co-investigator on the EU Project PHEME, which studies the spread of rumours in social media. She is also a co-I on an IBM Faculty award for developing a course on Big Data ethics. Dr Liakata is leading a project funded by the Warwick Innovation Fund to diagnose and monitor dementia using text analysis. She has been recently appointed Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute where she plans to work on methods for combining heterogenenous textual and non-linguistic data for understanding mental health.

Website: Dr Maria Liakata

Dr Mark Freestone
Since Dr Freestone's initial appointment to Queen Mary in 2009, he has worked on studies including the epidemiology of violence; outcomes research in forensic mental health services; causal inference networks for violence risk management; clinical sub-types of personality disorder and psychopathy; substance misuse as a risk factor for violence; and patterns of service use by young men in the UK. His current research is into causal mechanisms in risk assessment using Bayesian Networks, and the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for offenders with personality disorder.

Dr Freestone has previously held grants from both the NIHR and ESRC. In 2015 he received funding from the Ministry of Justice to conduct a mixed-method evaluation of the combined Ministry of Justice/NHS England initiative to develop Psychologically Informed Planned Environments (PIPEs) within HM Prison Service and the Probation service across England and Wales.

Website: Dr Mark Freestone

Dr Maria Liakata
Opportunities and challenges in employing automated analysis of language and heterogeneous user generated content to support monitoring of mental health

Bio & Bibliography

Dr Maria Liakata has a DPhil from the University of Oxford on learning pragmatic knowledge from text and her research interests include text mining, natural language processing (NLP), related social and biomedical applications, analysis of multi-modal and heterogeneous data (text from various sources such as social media, sensor data, images) and biological text mining. Her work has contributed to advances in knowledge discovery from corpora, automation of scientific experimentation and automatic extraction of information from the scientific literature. She has published widely both in NLP and interdisciplinary venues.
Dr Liakata's research interests are in the following areas: text mining, natural language processing (NLP), biomedical text mining, sentiment analysis, NLP for social media, machine learning for NLP and biomedical applications, computational semantics, scientific discourse analysis.
Dr Liakata is researching NLP for social science. She holds an IBM Faculty Award for studying “Emotion sensing using heterogeneous mobile phone data” and is a co-investigator on the EU Project PHEME, which studies the spread of rumours in social media. She is also a co-I on an IBM Faculty award for developing a course on Big Data ethics. Dr Liakata is leading a project funded by the Warwick Innovation Fund to diagnose and monitor dementia using text analysis. She has been recently appointed Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute where she plans to work on methods for combining heterogenenous textual and non-linguistic data for understanding mental health.

Previously she held an Early Career Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust (2010-2013) on reasoning with scientific articles

Dr Liakata's research takes place with these groups:
Intelligent and Adaptive Systems
Computational Biology

Dr Mark Freestone
Thinking causally about personality, offending and violence prevention

Synopsis
In this talk I want to integrate three strands of work I have been involved with over the previous three years that relate to causality, personality and violence. I want to consider the implications of adopting a causal, as opposed to predictive, approach to violence risk assessment and management within health and criminal justice services, including the problems with implementing such an approach. I will then relate this to our work with the UK Ministry of Justice initiative on pathway services for men and women with a likely personality disorder to think about a what a causally informed logic model for personality disorder treatment, incorporating developmental psychopathology, would look like; and how this might contribute to developing a preventive approach to mental disorder and violence.

Bio & Bibliography

Dr Mark Freestone is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University, London. His core research interests include: psychosocial treatment of mental health, particularly personality disorder; forensic mental health; the epidemiology of violence; clinical presentation and sub-types of psychopathy; and criminological research relating to prisons and prisoners.

He is also a University Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute, and his work follows three areas: i) developing risk models to predict and manage violence in mental health services; 2) software and capacity for causal modelling for negative outcomes within mental health services in East London; and iii) predicting risk of violence among high-risk offenders on probation supervised by the National Probation Service (NPS).

For further bibliographic entries see below

Dr Morton Schatzman: Chair
Dr. Morton Schatzman is an American medical doctor and psychiatrist who works in the UK a a non-medical psychotherapist. He has authored books, articles, and book reviews. He co-founded the Arbours Association and is the chair of its board of trustees.
Notes and links

• AAP : Association of Arbours Psychotherapists
• UKCP : UK Council for Psychotherapy
• CPJA : Council for Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis

AAP | Arbours Association
The Arbours was established in the early 1970’s by Dr Joseph Berke and Morton Schatzman and influenced by thinkers such as RD Laing. Through therapeutic communities Arbours aim to provide a non-institutional alternative to psychiatric treatment for individuals, where the autonomy and unique potential of each individual is respected.

Arbours is also a founding member organisation of the UKCP (CPJA section).

The AAP is the professional body of Arbours
https://www.arboursassociation.org
This conference:-
https://aapweb.website
This site provides background to the AAP/CPJA Conference, 21st Spetember 2019,
with the ability to purchase tickets and be provided with further
information as it is made available.

UKCP | About UKCP
We are the leading organisation for the education, training and accreditation of psychotherapists and psychotherapeutic counsellors in the UK.
PSYCHOTHERAPY.ORG.UK
Council for Psychoanalysis and Jungian Analysis
Find a psychotherapist with extensive training.
CPJA.ORG.UK

Will Artificial Intelligence change the role of the Psychotherapist?

What are the implications of new research on the profession, as psychotherapy looks toward the future?

New technology may have a great impact on our profession.

A colossal amount of behavioural data and attendant expertise in sifting and interpreting it has accrued.

Can big data and AI be aligned with, or will it corrupt, the ethics of psychotherapy?

Meanwhile, neuroscience has located sites in the brain that correspond to various human mental faculties. Are the findings relevant to the theories of psychotherapy? To the practice? These are some of the questions we will be discussing at the conference.

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Andrew Buchanan | Unsplash
Society and The Ethics of Data Handling

e.g. in the NHS
This conference is not about Data handling in the NHS, about whether or not there are ethical concerns with how this is now implemented.
More To Read Below …
This discusion is not about the details of the type or the quality of that data (perhaps in the EHR - Electronic Health Record - ) as compared to Big Data, what ever the latter maybe.

Security

Nor just about security (where data or records are intercepted or tampered with by third parties). It is about ownership, privacy and agency in the originators of this data.

Institutional Ethics

It is not enough, however, to assume the ethical practices of our institutions cover the scenarios being scrutinised here — they may not.

Further Steps — Involvement

There is a great deal of work to be done in filling in the detail, understanding, and refining these processes and the many steps they entail.

While in this conference we look in some detail at the work being done in AI and neuroscience that can enlighten us in our practice and, possibly, provide different approaches to treatment, complex areas in themselves, the broader context is that of diagnosis and provision. Beyond that the context is that of society at large.
Disruptive technologies mean just that, they are disruptive to established ways of going about things, to the existing settlement. Discusion implies that it is better to be aware of possible eventualities, to exercise our own agnecy so far as we can.

The conference is 9.00am – 5.00pm on Saturday, September 21st 2019


— Privacy —

^How did it come about that issues of social cohesion became categorised as politics, outside of the proper consideration of therapists? Does thinking in terms of the functions and facilities of the brain exaggerate this omission? This comes around to diagnostics again. Are diagnostic categories partial and lending themselves to a particular means of provision, in this country through the NHS? We know about the work pipelines given to different clinics. We know that these then become work silos, a patient with several conditions is referred to different clinics all in the course of the same week. This would seem to be understandable when those conditions are physical, although this is also might be thought of as a contentious attitude. When it comes to clinics for, say, OCDC and, separately, ADHD we should wonder. (I have heard from a patient that this does happen.) Privacy does come into this: It is not that there is a leak of private information or something like that. It is that when services are atomised they are also fragmented and the result is that information is not held onto in one place by one helping carer, or well communicating group of carers collaborating together with the person being cared for. These distinctions are somewhat subtle, but important. For example, if AI systems were to be used to aid communication, can those systems be built to aleviate the problems of pipe line stream lining of work flows, or would they be built so as to exacerbate these issues? There are many similar examples, both larger and smaller, that can be drawn out: in whose service are these new tools to perform?

Some Further Background & Bibliographic Materials

Professor Jeremy Holmes
Dr Kate Devlin
Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova
Read More …

Notes and References
Read More Below …

Professor Jeremy Holmes
Books:
John Bowlby and Attachment Theory (1993/2013 2nd Edition, Routledge), The Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy (2005, co-editors Glen Gabbard and Judy Beck)
Storr's The Art of Psychotherapy (Taylor & Francis 2012) Exploring In Security: Towards an Attachment-informed Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy (Routledge 2010) which won the 2010 Canadian Psychological Association Goethe Award.
Papers:
A key paper Holmes authored on this topic is Attachment in Therapeutic Practice (with Arietta Slade) SAGE 2017
2013 saw the 6-volume compendium of the 100 most important papers in Attachment (Benchmarks in Psychology: Attachment Theory, SAGE, co-edited with A. Slade)
Literature and the Therapeutic Imagination and Attachments: Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis were published by Routledge in 2014

Dr Kate Devlin
Books:
Turned On
'Illuminating, witty and written with a wide open mind' Sunday Times

The idea of the seductive sex robot is the stuff of myth, legend and science fiction. From the myth of Laodamia in Ancient Greece to twenty-first century shows such as Westworld, robots in human form have captured our imagination, our hopes and our fears. But beyond the fantasies there are real and fundamental questions about our relationship with technology as it moves into the realm of robotics.

Turned On explores how the emerging and future development of sexual companion robots might affect us and the society in which we live. It explores the social changes arising from emerging technologies, and our relationships with the machines that someday may care for us and about us. Sex robots are here, and here to stay, and more are coming.

Computer scientist and sex-robot expert Kate Devlin is our guide as we seek to understand how this technology is developing. From robots in Greek myth and the fantastical automata of the Middle Ages through to the sentient machines of the future that embody the prominent AI debate, she explores the 'modern' robot versus the robot servants we were promised by twentieth century sci-fi, and delves into the psychological effects of the technology, and issues raised around gender politics, diversity, surveillance and violence. This book answers all the questions you've ever had about sex robots, as well as all the ones you haven't yet thought of.

Professor Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasove
Books:
Books: A Mathematical Study of Calcium Oscillations and Waves: Inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-induced calcium oscillations in non-excitable cells (VDM Verlag April 24, 2009)

Papers:
Age-dependent changes in clock neuron structural plasticity and excitability are associated with a decrease in circadian output behavior and sleep

JA Curran, E Buhl, K Tsaneva-Atanasova, JJL Hodge (Neurobiology of aging 77, 158-168 2019)

Calcium Determining the relationship between hot flushes and LH pulses in menopausal women using mathematical modelling
Authors Julia K Prague, Margaritis Voliotis, Sophie Clarke, Alexander N Comninos, Ali Abbara, Channa N Jayasena, Rachel E Roberts, Lisa Yang, Johannes D Veldhuis, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova, Craig A McArdle, Waljit S Dhillo (The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 2019/4/15)

AT-LB040 Measuring LH Pulsatility in Patients with Reproductive Disorders Using a Novel Robotic Aptamer-Enabled Electrochemical Reader (RAPTER) W Dhillo, S Liang, A Kinghorn, M Voliotis, J Prague, J Veldhuis, ...

(Journal of the Endocrine Society 3 (Supplement_1), SAT-LB040 2019)

Mathematics for Healthcare as Part of Computational Medicine

K Tsaneva-Atanasova, VD Diaz (Frontiers in physiology 9, 985 2018)

Influence of facial feedback during a cooperative human-robot task in schizophrenia Laura Cohen, Mahdi Khoramshahi, Robin N Salesse, Catherine Bortolon, Piotr Słowiński, Chao Zhai, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova, Mario Di Bernardo, Delphine Capdevielle, Ludovic Marin, Richard C Schmidt, Benoit G Bardy, Aude Billard, Stéphane Raffard (Nature Publishing Group 2017/11/3)

Unravelling socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia Piotr Słowiński, Francesco Alderisio, Chao Zhai, Yuan Shen, Peter Tino, Catherine Bortolon, Delphine Capdevielle, Laura Cohen, Mahdi Khoramshahi, Aude Billard, Robin Salesse, Mathieu Gueugnon, Ludovic Marin, Benoit G Bardy, Mario Di Bernardo, Stephane Raffard, Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova (npj Schizophrenia vol3 2017)

Dr Oliver Bashford
Dr Mark Freestone
Dr Maria Liakata
Read More …

Notes and References
Read More Below …

Dr Oliver Bashford
Papers:

Using data linkage to electronic patient records to assess the validity of selected mental health diagnoses in English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) (Authors: Katrina Alice Southworth Davis, Oliver Bashford, Amelia Jewell, Hitesh Shetty, Robert J. Stewart, Cathie L. M. Sudlow, Matthew Hugo Hotopf. Published: March 26, in open access, peer reviewedPlos One)

Keep On Exploring …

Dr Mark Freestone
Keep On Exploring … Dr. Mark Freestone, Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry at Queen Mary University of London, served as TV drama Killing Eve’s psychiatry consultant

Papers:

Traumas of forming: The introduction of Community Meetings in the dangerous and severe personality disorder (DSPD) environment Claire Moore and Mark Freestone published in Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal for Therapeutic and Supportive Organizations 27(2):193-209 · June 2006

A descriptive evaluation of patients and prisoners assessed for dangerous and severe personality disorder Mark C Freestone, Tim Kirkpatrick, Simon Draycott and Sylvia Cooper published in Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology April 2010  

Subtypes of psychopathy in the British household population: Findings from the national household survey of psychiatric morbidity Jeremy Weir Cold, Mark C Freestone and Simone Ullrich published in Social Psychiatry 47(6):879-91 · May 2011

Dr Freestone's work with the Turing Institute will follow three work packages:
Development of risk models for prediction and management of violence in mental health services. In collaborating with local Mental Health Trusts, this will pursue the development of software and capacity for the implementation of causal modelling for negative outcomes (e.g. offending; relapse of mental health disorder) within clinical and forensic services in East London.
Expert knowledge elicitation methods in development of machine learning algorithms. Building on previous work using expert knowledge elicitation in understanding risk drivers (e.g. Constantinou, Freestone et al., 2014; 2015), as well as methodological developments applicable elsewhere.
Using machine learning approaches to interrogate health service use patterns. In collaboration with local Trusts and Clinical Commissioning Groups, this research will use advanced probabilistic techniques to consider drivers for success and failure of services users access mental health and primary care services within East London.

Other

For further information see Mark’s website.

Dr Mark Freestone, Queen Mary's University, London

Dr Maria Liakata
Dr Maria Liakata is leading a project funded by the Warwick Innovation Fund to diagnose and monitor dementia using text analysis. She has recently been appointed a Faculty Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute, where she plans to work on methods for combining heterogeneous textual and non-linguistic data for understanding mental health

Papers:
The language of mental health problems in social media authors: George Gkotsis, Anika Oellrich, Tim Hubbard, Richard Dobson, Maria Liakata, Sumithra Velupillai, Rina Dutta published in [Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Computational Lingusitics and Clinical Psychology](https://www.aclweb.org/anthology/W16-0307 2016)

Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning Authors; George Gkotsis, Anika Oellrich, Sumithra Velupillai, Maria Liakata, Tim JP Hubbard, Richard JB Dobson, Rina Dutta (published in Scientific reports 2017)

Towards detecting rumours in social media Authors Arkaitz Zubiaga, Maria Liakata, Rob Procter, Kalina Bontcheva, Peter Tolmie presented at a conference: Workshops at the Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence 2015/4/1

Don't Let Notes Be Misunderstood: A Negation Detection Method for Assessing Risk of Suicide in Mental Health Records Authors George Gkotsis, Sumithra Velupillai, Anika Oellrich, Harry Dean, Maria Liakata, Rina Dutta published in Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Computational Lingusitics and Clinical Psychology 2016

Three hybrid classifiers for the detection of emotions in suicide notes Authors: Maria Liakata, Jee-Hyub Kim, Shyamasree Saha, Janna Hastings, Dietrich Rebholz-Schuhmann (Published in Biomedical informatics insights SAGE 2012)

Dr Maria Liakata
Keep On Exploring …

Prof Shoshana Zuboff
Dr Chris Mathys
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Notes and References
Read More Below …

Prof Shoshana Zuboff

Further work
See this synoptic list of further publications

Further Praise for The Age Of Surveillance Capitalism
The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: Comments and Reviews Advance Praise for The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

“Shoshana Zuboff has produced the most provocative compelling moral framework thus far for understanding the new realities of our digital environment and its anti-democratic threats. From now on, all serious writings on the internet and society will have to take into account The Age of Surveillance Capitalism.” —Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Annenberg School, University of Pennsylvania

“In the future, if people still read books, they will view this as the classic study of how everything changed. The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is a masterpiece that stunningly reveals the essence of twenty-first-century society, and offers a dire warning about technology gone awry that we ignore at our peril. Shoshana Zuboff has somehow escaped from the fishbowl in which we all now live and introduced to us the concept of water. A work of penetrating intellect, this is also a deeply human book about what is becoming, as it relentlessly demonstrates, a dangerously inhuman time.” —Kevin Werbach, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and author of The Blockchain and the New Architecture of Trust

“I will make a guarantee: Assuming we survive to tell the tale, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism has a high probability of joining the likes of Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations and Max Weber’s Economy and Society as defining social- economics texts of modern times. It is not a ‘quick read’; it is to be savored and re-read and discussed with colleagues and friends. No zippy one-liners from me, except to almost literally beg you to read/ingest this book.” —Tom Peters, coauthor of In Search of Excellence

“The defining challenge for the future of the market economy is the concentration of data, knowledge, and surveillance power. Not just our privacy but our individuality is at stake, and this very readable and thought-provoking book alerts us to these existential dangers. Highly recommended.” —Daron Acemoglu, coauthor of Why Nations Fail Biblio
Publishers Page: "The Age Of Surveillance Capitalism" Articles — Interviews - Videos
Recent Publications, Interviews and Videos:
Other
Website
Shoshana Zuboff Main Web Site:
twitter: [@shoshanzuboff]
Keep On Exploring …

Dr Chris Mathys
Keep On Exploring …

Chris Mathys’s group develops and tests computational models of inference, learning, and action as they are implemented in the brain, with a particular focus on the role of neuromodulators such as dopamine and serotonin. A key feature of this modeling is the reduction of Bayesian inference to updates driven by precision-weighted prediction errors.
Abbreviated bibliography
Siegel, J.Z., Mathys, C., Rutledge, R.B., & Crockett, M.J. (2018). Beliefs about bad people are volatile. Nature Human Behaviour 1. (https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0425-1)

Katthagen, T., Mathys, C., Deserno, L., Walter, H., Kathmann, N., Heinz, A., & Schlagenhauf, F. (2018). Modeling subjective relevance in schizophrenia and its relation to aberrant salience. PLOS Computational Biology 14, e1006319. (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006319)

Mirza, M.B., Adams, R.A., Mathys, C., Friston, K.J. (2018). Human visual exploration reduces uncertainty about the sensed world. PLOS ONE 13, e0190429. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0190429)

Rigoli, F., Mathys, C., Friston, K.J., Dolan, R.J. (2017). A unifying Bayesian account of contextual effects in value-based choice. PLOS Computational Biology 13, e1005769. (doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005769)

Powers, A.R., Mathys, C., Corlett, P.R., 2017. Pavlovian conditioning–induced hallucinations result from overweighting of perceptual priors. Science 357(6351), 596–600. (doi:10.1126/science.aan3458)

Lawson, R.P., Mathys, C., Rees, G. (2017). Adults with autism overestimate the volatility of the sensory environment. Nature Neuroscience 20(9), 1293–1299. (doi:10.1038/nn.4615)

Diaconescu, A.O., Litvak, V., Mathys, C., Kasper, L., Friston, K.J., Stephan, K.E. (2017). A computational hierarchy in human cortex. arXiv:1709.02323 [q-bio].

Other

Talks
Last Talk
Hierarchical Bayesian modelling of volatile environments
Quantitative Life Sciences Guest Seminar
The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Trieste, March 8, 2017
For further information see Chris’ website.

Web page:- Chris Mathys | Cognitive Neuroscience Member of the faculty of Sissa

Gregory Bateson
Dr Prashant Parikh
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Notes and References
Read More Below …

Gregory Bateson

Little came from his first fieldwork among the Baining and Sulka people of New Britain, but the classic Naven (1936, 2nd ed. 1965) was the result of his work among the Iatmul, which began in 1929 and continued into the 1930s. His reputation in anthropology still rests to a considerable degree on this first book. Later, in the 1930s, he collaborated in field research in Bali with Margaret Mead, reported in Balinese Character (1942). In the 1940s and 1950s he brought his ethnographic method to bear on schizophrenia and other psychiatric phenomena (notably, disturbed communication within families) to considerable theoretical effect, and Steps to an Ecology of Mind Steps to an Ecology of Mind he also did research on the behavior of other species: sea otters and octopuses, and most importantly, porpoises. This work resulted in Communication: The Social Matrix of Psychiatry (1951), written with the psychiatrist Jurgen Ruesch; in Perceval's Narrative (1961), and in some of the items in his collected papers, Steps to an Ecology of Mind (1972). If the subjects of his research seem disparate, the list of topics over which he ranged seems even more so: biological evolution, adaptation, ecology, art, arms races, social organization, communication, cultural transmission, learning, play, fantasy, films, character and personality, and, more generally, the nature and pathologies of thinking and epistemology, of culture, and of a great class of integrative processes which he eventually called "mind." But he dealt with these phenomena in terms of a coherent and increasingly integrated set of highly abstract concepts influenced mostly by theories of communication and by cybernetics.
Found at:- The institute of Intercultural Studies
Selected bibliography 2000 (1972). Steps to an Ecology of Mind. Chicago:The University of Chicago Press.
1974. Perceval's Narrative: A Patient's Account of His Psychosis, 1830-1832. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc. Editor.
2002 (1979). Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity. . Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.
2004 (1987), with Mary Catherine Bateson. Angels Fear: Towards an Epistemology of the Sacred. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.
1991. A Sacred Unity: Further Steps to an Ecology of Mind. Edited by Rodney Donaldson. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.
Wikipedia entry extract — Gregory Bateson (9 May 1904 – 4 July 1980) was an English anthropologist, social scientist, linguist, visual anthropologist, semiotician, and cyberneticist whose work intersected that of many other fields. In the 1940s, he helped extend systems theory and cybernetics to the social and behavioral sciences. He spent the last decade of his life developing a "meta-science" of epistemology to bring together the various early forms of systems theory developing in different fields of science. His writings include Steps to an Ecology of Mind (1972) and Mind and Nature (1979). Angels Fear (published posthumously in 1987) was co-authored by his daughter Mary Catherine Bateson. In Palo Alto, California, Bateson and his colleagues Donald Jackson, Jay Haley and John H. Weakland developed the double-bind theory (see also Bateson Project).

Found at:- Gregory Bateson - wikipedia

Dr Prashant Parikh
Keep On Exploring …


Prashant Parikh was a Senior Research Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania and Stanford University. Now an independent scholar, he is a pioneer in the application of game theory to communication and meaning, and the author of three books on philosophical and linguistic semantics including Language and Equilibrium from which the following are extracted.


Equilibrium semantics rests on the four fundamental ideas of reference, use, indeterminacy, and equilibrium because these features inhere in meaning; they are not imposed on it by the framework. pp.13.

Situated games of partial information play a central role in capturing all four of these ideas in a unified mathematical framework. pp.14.

The only framework today that has an apparatus with a mathematically formulated and philosophically sound conception of agency is that of game and decision theory. pp. 20.

For language, equilibrium enters essentially through the element of choice : the speaker must choose his utterance and the addressee must choose her interpretation and these choices must be in balance. As we will see, the speaker and addressee participate in multiple games at multiple levels in a single utterance—at the level of words, phrases, and the sentence itself—and so there are multiple equilibria that occur in communication. Not only does each equilibrium involve a balance among the choices and strategies available to the speaker and addressee in each game, but the multiple equilibria are themselves in balance: an equilibrium of equilibria! pp.26.

Parakh approaches the long standing division between semantics and pragmatics in liguistics which he believes he resolves by further thorough analysis. Parakh details his arguments in the Introduction of this work. While I may be influenced by his thinking personally, for instance my enthusiasm for a Kripke type modal logic of hyperthetical worlds to underpin the importance of the imagination might be tempered by considerations of situational use and ambiguity of communication my focus here is far mor restricted and specific. Parakh believes that his solution is computationally tractable and it is this possibility we should contemplate, whether we follow his reasoning or it is found sufficient and complete or not. The point here is the contrast with the possibility of a field, called "meaning", which can be computed over, what the exchange of give and take would be with those machines, set against an idea that this just is not possible. Where do we stand in this picture?

Professor Judea Pearl
Professor Karl Friston FRS
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Notes and References
Read More Below …

Professor Judea Pearl
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Judea Pearl created the representational and computational foundation for the processing of information under uncertainty.

He is credited with the invention of Bayesian networks, a mathematical formalism for defining complex probability models, as well as the principal algorithms used for inference in these models. This work not only revolutionized the field of artificial intelligence but also became an important tool for many other branches of engineering and the natural sciences. He later created a mathematical framework for causal inference that has had significant impact in the social sciences. A Turing Award-winning computer scientist and statistician shows how understanding causality has revolutionized science and will revolutionize artificial intelligence

The Book Of Why?

“Correlation is not causation.” This mantra, chanted by scientists for more than a century, has led to a virtual prohibition on causal talk. Today, that taboo is dead. The causal revolution, instigated by Judea Pearl and his colleagues, has cut through a century of confusion and established causality–the study of cause and effect–on a firm scientific basis. His work explains how we can know easy things, like whether it was rain or a sprinkler that made a sidewalk wet; and how to answer hard questions, like whether a drug cured an illness. Pearl’s work enables us to know not just whether one thing causes another: it lets us explore the world that is and the worlds that could have been. It shows us the essence of human thought and key to artificial intelligence. Anyone who wants to understand either needs The Book of Why.

Professor Karl Friston
Keep On Exploring …

Karl Friston is a theoretical neuroscientist and authority on brain imaging. He invented statistical parametric mapping (SPM), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and dynamic causal modelling (DCM).
These contributions were motivated by schizophrenia research and theoretical studies of value-learning, formulated as the dysconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia. Mathematical contributions include variational Laplacian procedures and generalized filtering for hierarchical Bayesian model inversion.
Friston currently works on models of functional integration in the human brain and the principles that underlie neuronal interactions.
His main contribution to theoretical neurobiology is a free-energy principle for action and perception (active inference).
Friston received the first Young Investigators Award in Human Brain Mapping (1996) and was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (1999).
In 2000 he was President of the international Organization of Human Brain Mapping.
In 2003 he was awarded the Minerva Golden Brain Award and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2006. In 2008 he received a Medal, College de France and an Honorary Doctorate from the University of York in 2011.
He became of Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology in 2012, received the Weldon Memorial prize and Medal in 2013 for contributions to mathematical biology and was elected as a member of EMBO (excellence in the life sciences) in 2014 and the Academia Europaea in (2015).
He was the 2016 recipient of the Charles Branch Award for unparalleled breakthroughs in Brain Research and the Glass Brain Award - a lifetime achievement award in the field of human brain mapping. He holds Honorary Doctorates from the University of Zurich and Radboud University.

Research
Imaging Neuroscience & Theoretical Neurobiology
The Group develops advanced mathematical techniques that allow researchers to characterise brain organisation. This involves creating models of how the brain is wired and how it responds in different situations. These models are used to interpret measured brain responses using brain imaging and electromagnetic brain signals.
Research within this group has been concerned with two issues:-
First, in imaging neuroscience, there have been considerable advances in Bayesian estimation and inference in causal models.
The Group has developed procedures to make Bayesian inferences about evoked brain responses using posterior probability maps. This, and other Bayesian estimation advances in the context of hemodynamic responses and dynamic causal modeling, rests upon some basic work using expectation maximization in the context of hierarchical models. Work on dynamic causal modeling of interactions among brain areas has been implemented in the SPM software package. Much of this work is a prelude to integrating EEG and fMRI.

Second, the programme has developed generative models of brain function and mean field approximations to characterise ensemble dynamics in neuronal populations.
The former theme has focused on backward connections in the brain and their role in perceptual synthesis. The framework lends itself to a Bayesian interpretation in the context of hierarchical generative or forward models that could be plausibly implemented in cortical hierarchies. This theoretical work accommodates many previous imaging results and will be used to motivate questions that will be addressed using multi-modality imaging (EEG and fMRI).

    • 21st
      September 2019

      9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Finale to 5:50 PM Saturday, September 21st 2019


      New technology may have a great impact on our profession. A colossal amount of behavioural data and attendant expertise in sifting and interpreting it has accrued.
      Full Agenda Below

      What are the latest developments in AI and data gathering? How are they relevant to psychotherapy?
      Can big data and AI be aligned with, or will it corrupt, the ethics of psychotherapy?
      Meanwhile, neuroscience has located sites in the brain that correspond to various human mental faculties. Are the findings relevant to the theories of psychotherapy? To the practice? These are some of the questions we will be discussing at the conference.
      location_on Amnesty International, The Human Rights Action Centre
      17 - 25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A 3EA
      access_time Registration from 8:15 AM
      Welcome 8:45 AM
      9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
      Finale through to 5:50 PM

      For the morning and afternoon there will be three speakers delivering papers on different topics. There will be respondents to each paper and time for questions. There are two plenaries (morning and afternoon) and a final, longer plenary to end the proceedings.
      We aim to have lunch over an hour and a half.
      This allows attendees to be divided into two sections and each section divided into groups for fascilitated discussions.
      Everyone will have been informed of their group by email, and we will help at registration. Finally, have to for cheese and wine at the end of the day.
      Read The Full Agenda Below …

      Full Agenda Start

      Arrival from 8:15am
      8:15

      Welcome
      8:45

      Professor Jeremy Holmes MD, Department of Clinical Psychology in the School of Psychology, University of Exeter
      9:00

      The Brain has a Mind of its Own: AI, neurobiology and the science of psychotherapy

      Dr Kate Devlin, Social and Cultural Artificial Intelligence, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College, London

      9:35

      Technological change: forecasting our future relationships with machines


      Q & A
      10:10

      Break
      10:30

      Prof Krasimira Tsaneva-Atanasova, Turing Fellow, Professor of Mathematics for Healthcare, University of Exeter
      10:45

      Individual motor signatures and socio-motor biomarkers in schizophrenia


      Break
      11:20

      Plenary + Q & A With morning speakers. Plenary discussions chaired by Dr Morton Schatzman
      11:35

      Lunch and facilitated discussion groups (see below)*
      12:05
      45 minutes for each group

      Dr Oliver Bashford, Consultant liaison psychiatrist, East Surrey Hospital, Surrey and Borders Partnership, NHS Foundation Trust
      13:35

      Psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy: past, present and future


      Q & A
      14:10

      Dr Mark Freestone, Turing Fellow, Centre for Psychiatry, Wolfson Institute for Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University of London
      14:30

      Thinking causally about personality, offending, and violence prevention


      Break
      15:05

      Dr Maria Liakata, Turing Fellow, University of Warwick
      15:20

      Opportunities and challenges in employing automated analysis of language and heterogeneous user generated content to support monitoring of mental health


      Plenary + Q & A With afternoon speakers
      15:55

      Break
      16:15

      Final Plenary - Discussion with day’s speakers
      16:30

      Cheese and Wine
      17:00

      Finish at 5:50pm
      17:50
      *Attendees will be split into two groups. One group will have lunch, followed by discussion subgroups. The other will have discussion subgroups followed by lunch.